Showing 1– 5 of 64 results

  • While blight resistant tomato varieties are not immune to early blight or late blight, they have a stronger resilience than other types of tomatoes. By growing blight resistant tomatoes, you have a better chance at cultivating a healthy crop. Tomato blight is a common problem that attacks tomato leaves, stems, and fruit. There are two […]

    Blight Resistant Tomato Varieties

    While blight resistant tomato varieties are not immune to early blight or late blight, they have a stronger resilience than other types of tomatoes. By growing blight resistant tomatoes, you have a better chance at cultivating a healthy crop. Tomato blight is a common problem that attacks tomato leaves, stems, and fruit. There are two types: early blight and late blight. Both are caused by different types of fungi. Early blight attacks leaves and stems. It causes plants to under produce. Late...
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  • Tomato blight, in its different forms, is a disease that attacks a plant’s foliage, stems, and even fruit. Early blight (one form of tomato blight) is caused by a fungus, Alternaria solani, which over-winters in the soil and infected plants. Affected plants underproduce. Leaves may drop, leaving fruit open to sunscald. Early blight’s Latin name is […]

    Tomato Blight: How to Identify and Treat Early Blight in Tomatoes

    Tomato blight, in its different forms, is a disease that attacks a plant’s foliage, stems, and even fruit. Early blight (one form of tomato blight) is caused by a fungus, Alternaria solani, which over-winters in the soil and infected plants. Affected plants underproduce. Leaves may drop, leaving fruit open to sunscald. Early blight’s Latin name is sometimes confused with a form of tomato rot, alternaria, a different tomato problem altogether. To muddle matters further, early blight is...
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  • Tomato blight, in its different forms, is a disease that attacks a plant’s leaves, stems, and even fruit. Late blight (one form of tomato blight) is caused by a fungus, Phytophthora infestans, which also affects potatoes. The fungus was responsible for the Irish potato famine of 1845. It over-winters in infected potato tubers and perennial weeds […]

    Tomato Blight: How to Identify and Treat Late Blight in Tomatoes

    Tomato blight, in its different forms, is a disease that attacks a plant’s leaves, stems, and even fruit. Late blight (one form of tomato blight) is caused by a fungus, Phytophthora infestans, which also affects potatoes. The fungus was responsible for the Irish potato famine of 1845. It over-winters in infected potato tubers and perennial weeds (such as nightshade.) As the tubers and perennial seeds germinate during a new growing season, the fungus spreads to surrounding plants. What does...
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  • Whether you refer to a tomato as a fruit or a vegetable, there is no doubt that a tomato is a nutrient-dense, super-food that most people should be eating more of. The tomato has been referred to as a “functional food,” a food that goes beyond providing just basic nutrition. Due to their beneficial phytochemicals […]

    Tomatoes: Health Benefits, Facts, Research

    Whether you refer to a tomato as a fruit or a vegetable, there is no doubt that a tomato is a nutrient-dense, super-food that most people should be eating more of. The tomato has been referred to as a "functional food," a food that goes beyond providing just basic nutrition. Due to their beneficial phytochemicals such as lycopene, tomatoes also play a role in preventing chronic disease and deliver other health benefits Despite the popularity of the tomato, only 200 years ago it was thought...
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  • 1. Choose a bright, airy spot. Plant tomatoes where they will get at least 10 hours of light in summer. And leave room between plants for air to circulate. 2. Rotate even a little. Alternate your tomato bed between even just two spots and you diminish the risk of soil borne diseases such as bacterial spot and early […]

    Secrets to Tomato-Growing Success

    1. Choose a bright, airy spot. Plant tomatoes where they will get at least 10 hours of light in summer. And leave room between plants for air to circulate. 2. Rotate even a little. Alternate your tomato bed between even just two spots and you diminish the risk of soil borne diseases such as bacterial spot and early blight. 3. Pass up overgrown transplants. When buying tomato seedlings, beware of lush green starts with poor root systems. They will languish for weeks before growing. 4....
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